Georg Baselitz’s series of over-life-size carved wood heads, called Women of Dresden, made an impressive ensemble at the Pace Gallery on Fifty-seventh Street in October and November. These rough-hewn portraits, which range from three to five feet high and are mounted on tall bases, look like fragmentary remains of the monumental statuary of some ancient civilization. (They’re the size of colossal heads from the Roman Imperial period.) The uniform cadmium yellow with which Baselitz has painted the wood was the least likable element in the show; but once I had gotten beyond that lurid tint, I was stirred by Baselitz’s taste for bold, no-nonsense forms. If the crudely worked wood brings to mind the German Expressionists of the Teens and Twenties, Baselitz’s cautious Cubism, and his sense of female chic, bring to mind the Picasso of the Fifties. Though Baselitz has conceived the heads as free-standing works and given...

 
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